"Captain Marvel" New York Screening

NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 06: Brie Larson attends the "Captain Marvel" screening at Henry R. Luce Auditorium at Brookfield Place on March 6, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Dia Dipasupil/WireImage)

Dia Dipasupil

If you’re one of Brie Larson’s 2.2 million Instagram followers, then you are well aware that the actress is the ultimate queen of a weekly (dare we say) holiday known as Throwback Thursday. While you’re out here using the hashtag as an excuse to post that thirst trap you took last weekend or a blurry beach picture from your most recent vacation, Larson is providing content gold in the form of some truly embarrassing old red carpet pictures capturing the essence of early '00s fashion.

Lest you forget, our newly minted Captain Marvel—star of the Marvel Cinematic Universe's first female-fronted superhero movie, ever—has been acting, and thus hitting the red carpet, since 2001, making her backlog of pictures quite illustrious. She also made a brief foray into pop music, with her 2005 album Finally Out of P.E.. (If you are unfamiliar, please stop what you are doing and watch the masterpiece that is the music video for her single “She Said.” It is Napoleon Dynamite–themed, and you will not regret it.)

At Wednesday night’s New York City premiere of Captain Marvel, hosted by the Cinema Society with Synchrony Bank and Fiji Water, Larson arrived wearing an ensemble that would certainly be highly coveted by any tween circa 2004, albeit in a high-fashion iteration: a two-piece rainbow sequined set designed by Rodarte. It was certainly a far cry from Larson’s ensembles in the movie, a '90s-centric story that meant a lot of flannel and grunge band T-shirts.

So, is Larson saving any ‘90s throwback outfit photos of her own to celebrate the film’s release this Friday? “Well, I was like six years old [then].…” Larson, now 29, said with a laugh. Still, some might argue those outfits might be the most embarrassing of all. “At this point, the things that I’m posting are things that already exist on the Internet, which is kind of scary,” she continued. “I think once I’m done and all that the Internet has provided is done, perhaps I’ll go to my parents' basement and dig them up.”

Until then, enjoy some of Larson’s most iconic throwbacks.